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A Majority Of Massachusetts Is Now In A 'Severe' Drought

The water level is low on the banks of the Cambridge Reservoir looking south from Trapelo Road in Lincoln, as seen on July 26. (Jesse Costa/WBUR)
The water level is low on the banks of the Cambridge Reservoir looking south from Trapelo Road in Lincoln, as seen on July 26. (Jesse Costa/WBUR)
This article is more than 4 years old.

Massachusetts remains in the grip of a worsening drought.

According to the latest weekly update from the U.S. Drought Monitor, nearly 62 percent of the state is considered to be in severe drought, up from 40 percent a week ago.

In all, 92 percent of the state is in either moderate or severe drought, an area in which nearly 6.5 million people live. Only a slice of far western Massachusetts escapes the drought designation, though conditions there are considered "abnormally dry."

State environmental officials issued a drought watch on July 1 for portions of the state and many communities have issued restrictions on outdoor lawn watering or other water use.

National Weather Service meteorologist Lenore Correia expects the drought will be long term. Correia told WBUR's Newscast Unit it's imperative people conserve water.

"You need to reduce the amount of water you use outside watering your grass or your plants or just how much water consumption you actually are using because a lot of the rivers and reservoirs are actually low," Correia said.

Aside from possible showers or thunderstorms on Saturday, there is little or no rain forecast in the coming days.

And it's not just a Massachusetts issue: In total, New England is experiencing its worst drought in 14 years.

With reporting by The Associated Press and WBUR Newsroom

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