Support the news

Daily Rounds: Men Grieving; Military Joint Problems; Uptick In Deadly Tick Disease; Downturn In Chicken Pox

This article is more than 8 years old.

Men Seek Gender-Specific Bereavement Groups - NYTimes.com "The loss of a loved one is a profoundly heartbreaking experience, but it is not the same for everyone. Research increasingly suggests that men and women experience grief in different ways, and the realization has bolstered a nascent movement of bereavement groups geared to men throughout the country. Many of them are affiliated with hospitals and hospice centers." (nytimes.com)

The Research Report: Military at Risk for Joint Problems - WSJ.com "U.S. service members are at high risk of early disability from osteoarthritis due to the job's extreme physical demands, according to a study in Arthritis and Rheumatism. From 1999 to 2008, first-time diagnoses of osteoarthritis were recorded in active-duty service members from the Army, Navy, Air Force and Marine Corps. On average, 10,827 cases were diagnosed annually among about 1.4 million service members." (Wall Street Journal)

Rare tick disease cases on rise in Rhode Island - The Boston Globe "Babesiosis, once more commonly called Nantucket fever, is caused by a microscopic parasite transmitted by the bite of a deer tick. Healthy individuals may show no symptoms, though others might suffer from flulike complaints. But the disease can be life-threatening for the elderly or for people with weakened immune systems. Just 15 years ago, Rhode Island averaged less than one confirmed case of babesiosis each year, according to Thomas Mather, director of the University of Rhode Island’s Center for Vector-Borne Disease. State health records show 76 people tested positive for the disease last year, and 89 tested positive in 2009." (boston.com)

Chicken Pox Deaths Plummet With Help Of Vaccine : Shots - Health Blog : NPR "In the 12 years after the one-dose vaccination program was launched, deaths from varicella dropped 88 percent overall compared with the prevaccine years."  (npr.org)

This program aired on July 26, 2011. The audio for this program is not available.

+Join the discussion
TwitterfacebookEmail

Support the news