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CDC Report Tracks The IUD Renaissance

This article is more than 4 years old.

You might call it the "Comeback Contraception." In any case, it seems, IUD use is on the upswing.

This week's CDC National Health Statistic Report highlights the surge: The number of women using long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) has almost doubled in recent years, and most of the increase is due to the growing popularity of IUDs.

From the report:

Among women currently using contraception, use of LARC increased from 6.0% for 2006–2010 to 11.6% for 2011–2013. Use of IUDs makes up the bulk of this category, with 10.3% of current contraceptors using an IUD during 2011–2013.

The number of women using long-acting reversible contraception has increased from 6 percent in 2006 to 11.6 percent in recent years. (Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
The number of women using long-acting reversible contraception has increased from 6 percent in 2006 to 11.6 percent in recent years. (Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)

Intrauterine devices remain less popular than other forms of contraception, according to the report. The pill ranks as the most widely used method (it's taken by 25.9 percent of women who use contraception, or 9.7 million women), followed by female sterilization (25.1 percent, or 9.4 million women) and the male condom (used by just over 15 percent, or 5.8 million women).

Still, LARC devices, including IUDs and contraceptive implants, were used by 11.6 percent or 4.4 million women, according to the report: "While the most commonly used methods — female sterilization, the pill, and the male condom — appear to remain consistent over time, an increase has been noted in the use of LARC methods, primarily the IUD."

A confluence of events have contributed to the IUD's renaissance, experts say, including an improved product, a drop in price and more promotion by doctors, including the American Academy of Pediatrics, and backing by the family of Warren Buffett.

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Rachel Zimmerman previously reported on health and the intersection of health and business for Bostonomix.

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