Events

13
Sep

Paul Tough: How College Makes or Breaks Us

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Time & Date

Friday, September 13, 2019, 6:30 pm

Doors open at 5:30 p.m.

Event Location

WBUR CitySpace 890 Commonwealth Avenue Boston, MA 02215Open in Google Maps

New York Times best-selling author Paul Tough, best known for his writing on education, parenting, poverty and politics, returns with "The Years That Matter Most: How College Makes Or Breaks Us," a deep dive into the what opportunities college really provides.  He will be in conversation with journalist and author, Michael Pollan.

About "The Years That Matter Most"

Does college work? Does it provide real opportunity for young people who want to improve themselves and their prospects? Or is it simply a rigged game designed to protect the elites who have power and exclude everyone else? For many of us, our doubts and resentments about higher education live side by side with an appreciation, even a yearning, for the life-changing personal transformation that a college education can provide.

In "The Years That Matter Most," you will meet young people making their way through this system, with joy and frustration and sorrow: deciding how and where to apply, cramming for the SAT, braving a strange new campus, negotiating changing family relationships, and trying to find the resilience to recover from setbacks and downturns. You’ll encounter the individuals who, behind the scenes, make higher education go: from an SAT tutor hacking the test and his students’ stressed-out brains to a calculus professor turning potential drop-outs into math majors. And you’ll see the many shapes that college in America takes today, from Ivy League seminar rooms to community college welding shops; from giant public flagships to tiny, innovative experiments in urban storefronts.

The Years That Matter Most will shake you up, it will inspire and enrage you, and it will make you think differently about who we are as a country – and whether the American dream of opportunity and mobility is still worthy of our faith.