Rundown 8/1822:00
Download

Play
This article is more than 9 years old.

The President Hits The Road As Americans Give Him Bad Marks On The Economy

President Barack Obama speaks to the press after taking part in a roundtable discussion with small business owners in Seattle. (AP)
President Barack Obama speaks to the press after taking part in a roundtable discussion with small business owners in Seattle. (AP)

President Barack Obama today rolled up his shirt sleeves for a kitchen table conversation on the economy with an Ohio family. Meanwhile, a new poll is giving the president his worst marks yet for his handling of the economy. A new survey finds 61 percent of respondents saying the economy has gotten worse since Obama took office and only 41 percent approve of how he's handling it. We speak with Washington Post White House correspondent Michael Shear.

Az. Immigration Law Hurts Tourism But Could Help Private Prisons

While the most controversial parts of Arizona's new immigration law are now on hold right now, the impact of the law on business in the state is continuing. Tourism is down ten percent, after state officials who pushed for the law painted the state as crime-ridden, despite falling crime numbers. Investigative reporter Morgan Loew of CBS 5 News in Phoenix reports on that and tells us how private prisons, with connections to the state's political power brokers, could get a boost if the law does go into effect and police start rounding up scores of undocumented immigrants.

U.S. Leads The World In Rate Of Incarceration

The rate of incarceration in American jails has quadrupled since 1970, giving the US the highest per capita rate of incarceration in the world. The swelling numbers of prisoners are caused, in part, by the "ratchet" effect, where politicians trying to appear "tough on crime" propose stricter and stricter laws and leave judges little discretion to hand down lighter sentences. And then, there are arcane laws that few realize they've broken, until it's too late. We talk to The Economist's business editor, Robert Guest, who wrote about the phenomenon in a recent issue of the magazine.

Prosecutors Plan For New Blagojevich Trial

After three weeks of deliberations, 11 jurors were ready to convict former Illinois governor Rod Blagojevich in what prosecutors called a "political corruption crime spree," but one juror wouldn't budge and would agree only that Blagojevich lied to the FBI. Meanwhile, the jury also deadlocked on four felony charges against Blagojevich's brother, Robert. Both cases aren't over; the former Illinois governor plans to appeal his conviction and prosecutors are now planning for a second trial for his brother. Our guest is Chicago's WBEZ reporter Rob Wildeboer.

Tribal Lands Are Being Reborn

Sunset flares over Thunder Lake, one of 14 small lakes on the Red Lake Reservation in Minnesota, and sacred to the Chippewa. (© Jack Dykinga/National Geographic)
Sunset flares over Thunder Lake, one of 14 small lakes on the Red Lake Reservation in Minnesota, and sacred to the Chippewa. (© Jack Dykinga/National Geographic)

There's a growing environmental movement among Native Americans that aims to restore land that was once taken from them as an example for how we can save the environment. Journalist Chuck Bowden writes about the projects taken on by the Santa Clara Pubelo, the Chippewa and other tribes in the August issue of National Geographic.

Presidents Through The Ages Use White House Movie Room As A Political Tool

President Clinton, flanked by Govs. Ann Richards and Mario Cuomo, watches the Super Bowl with his daughter, Chelsea, in the White House's family theater during his presidency. (AP)
President Clinton, flanked by Govs. Ann Richards and Mario Cuomo, watches the Super Bowl with his daughter, Chelsea, in the White House's family theater during his presidency. (AP)

FDR had a movie theater built in the White House in 1942, where he and Winston Churchill enjoyed many screenings together. Since then, our guest says, presidents over the years have used Hollywood as their own personal Neflix — calling up studios and having any film they want shipped overnight — and they have often used the movie room to advance their political agendas and shape their images. Ted Johnson is deputy editor of Variety and author of the blog WilshireandWashington.com, about the intersection of entertainment and politics.

Music From The Show

  • Ashley MacIsaac, "Sleepy Maggie"
  • Freddie Hubbard, "Sunflower"
  • Peter Dixon, "Nagog Woods"
  • Christian McBride, "Theme for Kareem"
  • Medeski, Martin and Wood, "Bloody Oil"
  • Tom Jones, "Thunderball"

This segment aired on August 18, 2010.

Support the news

+Join the discussion
TwitterfacebookEmail

Support the news