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Controversy Roils Florida Senate Race On Eve Of Vote

Fla. Senate candidate U.S. Rep. Kendrick Meek, left, and former President Bill Clinton, at a rally for Meek in August. (AP)
Fla. Senate candidate U.S. Rep. Kendrick Meek, left, and former President Bill Clinton, at a rally for Meek in August. (AP)

Florida Democrat Kendrick Meek is denying reports that he almost dropped out of the race for U.S Senate. Meek has been trailing in the polls, far behind Republican Marco Rubio and Republican-turned-Independent Gov. Charlie Crist. Top aides to former President Clinton have said that Meek agreed, twice, to drop out and endorse Crist after discussions with the former President.  We have an update on the final weekend of Campaign 2010 with Rick Klein, senior Washington editor for ABC World News, and host of the ABC News political webcast Top Line.

Remember The Browns In 'Nashville Chrome'

In his new novel, "Nashville Chrome," author Rick Bass takes the true story of the country music group, The Browns, and weaves it into a tale of fame and regret. The Browns, siblings Jim Ed, Bonnie and Maxine, formed one of the hottest singing groups in the '50s and '60s — as big or even bigger than Elvis. The Browns' smooth, polished sound, known as "Nashville Chrome," proved to be their undoing because radio couldn't deal with their crossover appeal, and they broke up. Jim Ed went solo, Bonnie retired and Maxine kept a torch for the group. We speak to Maxine Brown and Rick Bass about "Nashville Chrome."

Tests Warned Of Cement Troubles Before BP Blowout

Federal investigators studying the Gulf of Mexico oil disaster say that Texas-based oil services company Halliburton skipped a critical test on cement used to seal BP's oil well before it blew last April, prompting the worst offshore oil spill in U.S. history. Investigators also say the company found repeated problems with the cement and used it anyway. Halliburton says the investigators' analysis is flawed. We speak with Ben Casselman, Wall Street Journal reporter based in Dallas.

Vampires Won't Die

Max Schreck as a vampire in the 1922 film "Nosferatu"
Max Schreck as a vampire in the 1922 film "Nosferatu"

From the 1922 silent film Nosferatu to today's Twilight series, vampires have a way of giving us the creeps. Sue Weaver Schopf thought vampires deserved a closer look. She's looked into the myths that pre-date Bram Stoker's Dracula and how economic conditions can influence literature and film about vampires. She's now teaching a class on the subject at Harvard Extension School. In honor of Halloween, we take a look at these creepy monsters.

Music From The Show

  • Jerry Douglas, "Rain on Oliviatown"
  • Freddie Hubbard, "Little Sunflower"
  • Fred Hersch, "Desafinado"
  • Joe Jackson, "Steppin' Out"
  • "Looking Back To See," written by Jim Ed and Maxine Brown, performed by The Browns
  • "The Three Bells," written by Bert Reisfeld and Jean Villard, performed by The Browns
  • “I Take The Chance," written by Ira and Charles Louvin, performed by The Browns
  • "Here Today And Gone Tomorrow," written by Jim Ed and Maxine Brown, performed by The Browns
  • "Sugarfoot Rag," written by Hank Garland and George Vaughn, performed by The Browns
  • "I'm In Heaven," written by Tom Bearden, performed by The Browns
  • "Sugar Cane County," written by Maxine Brown and Russell Brown, performed by Maxine Brown
  • L'Orchestra Cinematique, "Born To Darkness: Part 2" (from Interview With The Vampire: The Vampire Chronicles)
  • Howling Wolves: Halloween Ringtones and Scary Sound

This program aired on October 29, 2010.

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