South Struggles To Recover After Devastating Tornadoes02:36
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Mark Plunkett, left, with the help of Allen Southerland, right, find some of his wife's clothing in the debris of his Phil Campbell home Thursday. (AP)
Mark Plunkett, left, with the help of Allen Southerland, right, find some of his wife's clothing in the debris of his Phil Campbell home Thursday. (AP)

President Barack Obama is in storm-wracked Alabama today to get a firsthand look at some of the worst devastation left behind by dozens of tornadoes that swept across the Southeast. Obama landed Friday under blue skies that belied nature's wreckage. About 300 people have been killed by the storms, among the most powerful ever recorded.

Survivors of Wednesday's deadly tornadoes are wondering how they're going to put their lives back together. In the hardest-hit areas of Alabama, those whose homes are still standing are struggling with no electricity, and with little help from police who are stretched thin.  In Tuscaloosa, crews are still going through rubble, looking for more possible victims or survivors.

We speak to Dr. Angela Ramsey, an emergency room doctor at Tuscaloosa's DCH Regional Medical Center. (Disclaimer: this interview contains graphic content.)


Here's how you can help:


  • American Red Cross: Donate to the Red Cross, or text REDCROSS to 90999 to donate $10, or call 1-800-RED-CROSS
  • Salvation Army: Visit the Salvation Army's  donation page and designate "April 2011 Tornado Outbreak." You can also call 1-800-SAL-ARMY. Or you can text "GIVE" to 80888 to make a $10 donation.

This segment aired on April 29, 2011.

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