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Conn. Gov. To Commuters: Stay In NYC This Week06:02
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Metro North employees, in orange vests, help transfer westbound commuters at the transportation center in Bridgeport, Ct., to buses Monday, May 20, 2012, after a train collision on Friday injured 72 people and disrupted rail service into New York City. (Mark Lennihan/AP)
Metro North employees, in orange vests, help transfer westbound commuters at the transportation center in Bridgeport, Ct., to buses Monday, May 20, 2012, after a train collision on Friday injured 72 people and disrupted rail service into New York City. (Mark Lennihan/AP)

Pack an overnight bag. That's Connecticut Governor Dan Malloy's advice to commuters making their way into New York City this week.

Amtrak service is shut down between New Haven, Conn. and New York City after Friday's train collision and derailment that injured about 70 people.

Amtrak officials aren't saying when things will get back to normal on the country's busiest rail corridor, but service is affected as far north as Boston, where people scrambled to book buses.

Governor Malloy said the disruption will also snarl traffic.

Officials say Friday's collision impacts about 30,000 people who normally use the train.

Metro-North officials expected it would be days before train service was restored as crews worked around the clock to rebuild 2,000 feet of track, overhead wires and signals.

Inspections and tests also must be completed before service can return to normal, Metro-North President Howard Permut said. The damaged rail cars were removed from the tracks on Sunday, the first step toward making the repairs.

The last significant train collision involving Metro-North occurred in 1988 when a train engineer was killed in Mount Vernon, N.Y., when one train empty of passengers rear-ended another, railroad officials said.

The Associated Press contributed reporting to this article.

Guest:

This segment aired on May 20, 2013.

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