Brazilian President Excoriates U.S. Over Spying07:49
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President of Brazil Dilma Rousseff speaks during her address to the 68th Session of the United Nations General Assembly on Tuesday Sept. 24, 2013 in New York. (Andrew Burton/AP)
President of Brazil Dilma Rousseff speaks during her address to the 68th Session of the United Nations General Assembly on Tuesday Sept. 24, 2013 in New York. (Andrew Burton/AP)

Brazilian president Dilma Rousseff excoriated the U.S. during her address to the United Nations General Assembly, accusing the NSA of violating international law with what she called "indisciminate" collection of personal information of Brazilians, as well as economic espionage on the country's strategic industrites.

The speech comes the week after she canceled a planned visit to Washington in protest of the spying.

While the speech is hardly the first time the U.S. has been attacked in the General Assembly, Rousseff's speech was unusual in that it was made by a historically friendly state with an increasingly powerful economy.

Rousseff plans to leave New York without meeting Obama, though the Brazilian foreign minister is expected to meet with John Kerry later this week, in an attempt to begin mending the countries' relationship.

Here & Now speaks with NPR's South America correspondent, Lourdes Garcia-Navarro.

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This segment aired on September 25, 2013.

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