Is The STEM Crisis A Myth?07:47
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Teacher Heather Scott and students Stephanie Lamas, Dana Bielinski and Smriti Marwaha examine a test tube at Science Careers in Search of Women, hosted by the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory. (Argonne National Laboratory)
Teacher Heather Scott and students Stephanie Lamas, Dana Bielinski and Smriti Marwaha examine a test tube at Science Careers in Search of Women, hosted by the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory. (Argonne National Laboratory)

President Obama has asked that an "all hands on deck" approach be taken in regards to getting more people trained in the science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields because there is a shortage of qualified prospective employees.

Contributing editor for IEEE Spectrum magazine, Robert Charette, recently wrote a piece arguing the STEM crisis is a myth and that there are more people trained in the STEM fields than there are jobs. Charette says the myth has existed for years and it affects not only the U.S., but the global economy.

Guest

  • Robert Charette, contributing editor of IEEE Spectrum Magazine. He tweets @RiskFactorBlog.

This segment aired on October 14, 2013.

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