Will Sochi's 'Ring of Steel' Security Prevent Attacks?08:39
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Security personnel walk outside of Shayba Arena on January 8, 2014 in Alder, Russia. The region will host the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics which start on February 6th, 2014. (Michael Heiman/Getty Images)
Security personnel walk outside of Shayba Arena on January 8, 2014 in Alder, Russia. The region will host the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics which start on February 6th, 2014. (Michael Heiman/Getty Images)
This article is more than 5 years old.

With less than a month until the opening ceremonies for the Olympics in Sochi, Russia, security measures that are perhaps the most extensive and restrictive ever seen are being put into place.

Among them is a measure some are calling "the ring of steel" — a secured boundary 60 miles long and 25 miles wide where residents, visitors, athletes and vendors will be subjected to near-total surveillance.

Vehicles not registered in Sochi will not be allowed to enter the zone, not even for deliveries of retail goods or food. Visitors can also expect 25,000 special police officers and 8,000 interior troops, not to mention the 30,000 regular troops deployed along border regions with Georgia and Abkhazia.

All this just weeks after two suicide bombings in nearby Volgograd killed 34 people.

Security consultant William Rathburn, who was head of security at the 1996 Summer Olympics in Atlanta, joins Here & Now's Meghna Chakrabarti to discuss the security measures.

A terrorist bomb attack on the Centennial Olympic Park in Atlanta during the games killed three people and injured more than 100.

Guest

  • William Rathburn, security consultant who was head of security at the 1996 Atlanta Olympic Games. He's president of Rathburn and Associates, a security consulting firm in Tyler, Texas.

This segment aired on January 8, 2014.

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