Bridge Scandal Continues To Reverberate07:42
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New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, second left, arrives at Fort Lee, N.J., City Hall, Thursday, Jan. 9, 2014. Christie traveled to Fort Lee to apologize in person to Mayor Mark Sokolich. Moving quickly to contain a widening political scandal, Gov. Chris Christie fired one of his top aides Thursday and apologized repeatedly for the "abject stupidity" of his staff, insisting he had no idea anyone around him had engineered traffic jams to get even with a Democratic mayor. (Richard Drew/AP)
New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, second left, arrives at Fort Lee, N.J., City Hall, Thursday, Jan. 9, 2014. Christie traveled to Fort Lee to apologize in person to Mayor Mark Sokolich. Moving quickly to contain a widening political scandal, Gov. Chris Christie fired one of his top aides Thursday and apologized repeatedly for the "abject stupidity" of his staff, insisting he had no idea anyone around him had engineered traffic jams to get even with a Democratic mayor. (Richard Drew/AP)
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A day after New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie said he knew nothing about a traffic jam scheme as it was happening, more internal documents are expected to be released today.

The lane closings on the George Washington bridge last fall caused four days of major back-ups. Christie had previously said he had nothing to do with the closings, but documents released Wednesday revealed his administration may have intentionally caused the jam for political retribution.

Meanwhile, the Associated Press reports six New Jersey residents have filed a federal lawsuit against Christie and others, over the September traffic jams. One of the plaintiffs says her clients were late for work and one had a panic attack. They are trying to make it a class-action lawsuit.

New York Times reporter Kate Zernike joins Here & Now's Robin Young with the latest.

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This segment aired on January 10, 2014.

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