The Odds Of Achieving The American Dream04:28
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This map shows the average percentile rank of children who grow up in below-median income families across areas of the U.S. (absolute upward mobility). Lighter colors represent areas where children from low-income families are more likely to move up in the income distribution. To look up statistics for your own city, use the interactive version of this map created by the New York Times. (equality-of-opportunity.org)
This map shows the average percentile rank of children who grow up in below-median income families across areas of the U.S. (absolute upward mobility). Lighter colors represent areas where children from low-income families are more likely to move up in the income distribution. To look up statistics for your own city, use the interactive version of this map created by the New York Times. (equality-of-opportunity.org)
This article is more than 5 years old.

Upward mobility, the ability to get ahead in life and achieve prosperity, is at the heart of President Obama's 2014 agenda.

A new study from The Equality of Opportunity Project shows that the odds of moving up the ladder in the U.S. have remained constant during the past two decades. However, it remains lower than in Canada and in much of Western Europe, where the odds of escaping poverty are higher than in the U.S.

Derek Thompson, a senior business editor for The Atlantic, joins Here & Now's Jeremy Hobson to discuss the study and its implications.

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This segment aired on January 23, 2014.

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