Here & Now Here & Now

Support the news

Lawmakers Spar Over Whether Health Law Is 'Job Killer'04:42
Download

Play
House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan (R-WI), center, listens to ranking member Rep. Chris Van Hollen (D-MD), right, while Congressional Budget Office Director Douglas Elmendorf testifies before the committee in the Cannon House Office Building on Capitol Hill February 5, 2014 in Washington, DC. Committee members questioned Elmendorf about the latest projections by the CBO, which says the Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare, will affect supply and demand for labor, leading to a net reduction of about 2.5 million full-time jobs by 2024. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan (R-WI), center, listens to ranking member Rep. Chris Van Hollen (D-MD), right, while Congressional Budget Office Director Douglas Elmendorf testifies before the committee in the Cannon House Office Building on Capitol Hill February 5, 2014 in Washington, DC. Committee members questioned Elmendorf about the latest projections by the CBO, which says the Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare, will affect supply and demand for labor, leading to a net reduction of about 2.5 million full-time jobs by 2024. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
This article is more than 6 years old.

In a congressional hearing this morning, Republicans and Democrats in Congress sparred over the meaning of yesterday's Congressional Budget Office report that concluded that by 2017, two million Americans would chose to work fewer hours because of President Obama's health reform.

NPR's Julie Rovner joins Here & Now's Jeremy Hobson to discuss what the report actually says about who would choose to work fewer hours, and why.

Guest

This segment aired on February 5, 2014.

Support the news

Support the news