Anger In Hong Kong As Police Use More Force03:40
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Police prepare to confront pro-democracy protesters outside the central government offices in the Admiralty district of Hong Kong on October 15, 2014. Hong Kong police vowed October 14 to tear down more street barricades manned by pro-democracy protesters, hours after hundreds of officers armed with chainsaws and boltcutters partially cleared two major roads occupied for a fortnight. (Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images)
Police prepare to confront pro-democracy protesters outside the central government offices in the Admiralty district of Hong Kong on October 15, 2014. Hong Kong police vowed October 14 to tear down more street barricades manned by pro-democracy protesters, hours after hundreds of officers armed with chainsaws and boltcutters partially cleared two major roads occupied for a fortnight. (Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images)
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The beating of a pro-democracy protester by the police has raised anger and tensions in Hong Kong.

The beating, caught on tape by TVB — a Hong Kong station generally known to be pro-Beijing — shows the police hauling a protester to a dark corner and beating him.

The video went viral and the victim was quickly identified as a social worker and activist who, ironically, is a member of the 1,200 person committee that chooses Hong Kong's leader.

His lawyer said that his client was punched and kicked, "when his hands were actually cuffed at the same time behind his back, so there is no way he was posing a danger to anyone."

The officers involved have been reassigned as police investigate. The incident comes amid a sharp increase in the use of force by Hong Kong's authorities over the last 24 hours, with images showing police in riot gear using batons and pepper spray as they drag protestors away.

Meanwhile, Beijing issued its strongest words to date on the protests, calling them "radical and illegal acts," which are "doomed to fail."

Hong Kong's most prominent businessman, Li Ka Shing, who is also the richest man in Asia, has spoken out for the first time on the demonstrations — he's urging everyone to stay calm and for the protestors to go home: "Since the handover, the 'one country, two system' formula has protected Hong Kong's lifestyle ... I urge everyone not to be agitated. I urge everyone not to let today's passion become the regret for tomorrow. I earnestly request everyone to return to their families."

NPR's Frank Langfitt joins Here & Now's Jeremy Hobson to describe the latest in Hong Kong.

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This segment aired on October 15, 2014.

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