Advertisement

Obama Expresses 'Profound Regret' For Hostages Killed In Drone Strike04:47
Download

Play
U.S. President Barack Obama speaks during a press conference in the Brady Briefing Room of the White House on April 23, 2015 in Washington, D.C. The White House admitted Thursday that a January U.S. operation against an al-Qaida compound near the Afghan-Pakistan border killed one American and one Italian hostage, along with an American member of the jihadist group. The White House identified the hostages killed in the operation against the border compound as U.S. contractor Warren Weinstein and Italian aid worker Giovanni Lo Porto. (Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images)
U.S. President Barack Obama speaks during a press conference in the Brady Briefing Room of the White House on April 23, 2015 in Washington, D.C. The White House admitted Thursday that a January U.S. operation against an al-Qaida compound near the Afghan-Pakistan border killed one American and one Italian hostage, along with an American member of the jihadist group. The White House identified the hostages killed in the operation against the border compound as U.S. contractor Warren Weinstein and Italian aid worker Giovanni Lo Porto. (Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images)
This article is more than 6 years old.

President Barack Obama this morning apologized for the deaths of two hostages, Warren Weinstein, an American contractor, and Giovanni Lo Porto, an Italian aid worker. The two were killed in a counterterrorism operation on the border of Afghanistan and Pakistan in January, in which an American-born al-Qaida leader was also killed.

The president said that his administration's initial review of the drone strike found that it was "fully consistent" with U.S. counterterrorism guidelines, which require special legal clearances in order to directly target American terrorism suspects. NPR's Scott Horsley joins Here & Now's Robin Young with details.

Guest

This segment aired on April 23, 2015.

Advertisement

Advertisement