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What Corinthian Closures Tell Us About For-Profit Colleges06:01
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California Attorney General Kamala Harris gestures while standing by a display showing an internal document showing the target demographic of Corinthian Colleges in 2013. Harris sued the college company, alleging it misrepresented job placement rates to lure low-income state residents. Corinthian is closing its 28 remaining campuses, displacing about 16,000 students. (Eric Risberg/AP)
California Attorney General Kamala Harris gestures while standing by a display showing an internal document showing the target demographic of Corinthian Colleges in 2013. Harris sued the college company, alleging it misrepresented job placement rates to lure low-income state residents. Corinthian is closing its 28 remaining campuses, displacing about 16,000 students. (Eric Risberg/AP)
This article is more than 6 years old.

The for-profit college provider Corinthian Colleges announced Sunday that it is closing all of its 28 remaining campuses. The decision comes after the Department of Education put a hold on Corinthian's access to federal student loans last summer over concerns that it may have falsified job placement statistics for graduates.

Here & Now's Jeremy Hobson speaks with Derek Thompson, senior editor at the Atlantic, for a closer look at for-profit colleges in the U.S.

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This segment aired on April 27, 2015.

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