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California 'Water School' Washes Away Fines05:30
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A water conservationist for San Diego County Water Authority checks sprinkler flow on his lawn as part of the county's "Watersmart Checkup" Wednesday in Carlsbad, Calif. State regulators recently ordered communities to slash water use anywhere from 8 to 36 percent. (Gregory Bull/AP)
A water conservationist for San Diego County Water Authority checks sprinkler flow on his lawn as part of the county's "Watersmart Checkup" Wednesday in Carlsbad, Calif. State regulators recently ordered communities to slash water use anywhere from 8 to 36 percent. (Gregory Bull/AP)
This article is more than 5 years old.

Residents of Santa Cruz, California can attend "Water School," which is a one-night course on water conservation that, if taken, allows people to waive any penalties accrued for using too much water under the city's stringent mandatory rationing.

While policy is not yet active, the city expects to re-institute mandatory rationing of water for several months this year and for what is the second time in two years. The city gets all of its drinking water from local rivers, wells and rainfall. Households that use more than the allotment of about 60 gallons per person per day may be fined.

Here & Now's Robin Young speaks with Clara Cartwright, who teaches at the city's "Water School."

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This segment aired on May 11, 2015.

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