The Upside To Weeks Of Rain In Texas: Finally Emerging From Drought06:07
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Murphy Canning and Annika Rolston watch as a street remains underwater from days of heavy rain on May 25, 2015 in Austin, Texas. Texas Gov. Greg Abbott toured the damage zone where one person is confirmed dead and at least 12 others missing in flooding along the Rio Blanco, which reports say rose as much as 40 feet in places, caused by more than 10 inches of rain over a four-day period. The governor earlier declared a state of emergency in 24 Texas counties. (Drew Anthony Smith/Getty Images)
Murphy Canning and Annika Rolston watch as a street remains underwater from days of heavy rain on May 25, 2015 in Austin, Texas. Texas Gov. Greg Abbott toured the damage zone where one person is confirmed dead and at least 12 others missing in flooding along the Rio Blanco, which reports say rose as much as 40 feet in places, caused by more than 10 inches of rain over a four-day period. The governor earlier declared a state of emergency in 24 Texas counties. (Drew Anthony Smith/Getty Images)
This article is more than 4 years old.

Tropical Depression Bill, formerly Tropical Storm Bill, is making its way north across Texas, Oklahoma and Arkansas, bringing more rain to an area that's already seen more than its fair share in recent weeks.

But there has been an upside to the past month of heavy rains: some parts of Texas have finally emerged from years of devastating drought conditions. Take Wichita Falls, Texas, where a year ago the city's water supply reservoirs were less than a quarter full, and the city was at Stage 5 drought emergency conditions.

Here & Now's Jeremy Hobson checks back in with Wichita Falls City Manager Darron Leiker about his city's decision yesterday to finally lift emergency water restrictions, which have been in place for the last four years.

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This segment aired on June 17, 2015.

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