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The Intersection Of Politics And The Confederate Flag In South Carolina05:34
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The South Carolina and American flags fly at half-staff behind the Confederate flag, in front of the State House in Columbia, South Carolina on June 19, 2015. (Mladen Antonov/AFP/Getty Images)
The South Carolina and American flags fly at half-staff behind the Confederate flag, in front of the State House in Columbia, South Carolina on June 19, 2015. (Mladen Antonov/AFP/Getty Images)
This article is more than 5 years old.

Slain South Carolina state legislator Clementa Pinckney's body will lie in state at the South Carolina State House beginning tomorrow, but still in question is whether the controversial Confederate state flag, which has flown there since 1962, will be permanently removed.

Despite a powerful call by Governor Nikki Haley to remove a "deeply offensive symbol of a brutally offensive past," some are saying that legislators who want the flag removed continue to fight an uphill battle.

This, as GOP presidential candidates navigate a delicate political landscape in which some of their staunchest supporters want to retain the flag, and where corporate America is beginning to respond to pressure to remove the symbol from their businesses as well.

Glenn Smith of The Post and Courier in Charleston joins Here & Now's Robin Young to discuss the issues.

Guest

This segment aired on June 23, 2015.

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