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Advances In Treating Genetic Disorder Have Some Parents Excited, Others Wary05:50
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Terry Jo Bichell helps her son Louie take off his shoes. Louie, 16, has a severe intellectual disability caused by Angelman syndrome. (Emily Siner/WPLN)
Terry Jo Bichell helps her son Louie take off his shoes. Louie, 16, has a severe intellectual disability caused by Angelman syndrome. (Emily Siner/WPLN)
This article is more than 5 years old.

Researchers have made big strides in treating Angelman Syndrome — a rare genetic disorder. Those who have Angelman Syndrome usually can't talk, have trouble with motor skills and suffer seizures.

As Emily Siner of Here & Now's contributing station Nashville Public Radio reports, some parents of children with Angelman Syndrome are excited at the prospect of finding treatment, while others are wary about the possibility of a cure.

Reporter

This segment aired on July 14, 2015.

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