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What China's Stock Plunge Means For Its Government05:16
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A Chinese stock investor monitors share prices at a securities firm in Fuyang, in China's Anhui province on June 19, 2015.  Shanghai shares plunged 6.42 percent on June 19, ending a torrid week as the benchmark index was hit by tight liquidity and profit-taking after a powerful surge over the past year.    (STR/AFP/Getty Images)
A Chinese stock investor monitors share prices at a securities firm in Fuyang, in China's Anhui province on June 19, 2015. Shanghai shares plunged 6.42 percent on June 19, ending a torrid week as the benchmark index was hit by tight liquidity and profit-taking after a powerful surge over the past year. (STR/AFP/Getty Images)
This article is more than 5 years old.

It's been a bumpy ride for China's stock market this summer.

This week it's been especially yoyo-like, plunging and rebounding, as the government intervened. Meanwhile, there's social turmoil as well, with a state clampdown on dissent, including the detention of more than a hundred lawyers in recent weeks.

David Dollar, a senior foreign policy fellow with the John L. Thornton China Center at the Brookings Institution, speaks with Here & Now's Jeremy Hobson about what all this means for stability and confidence in the Xi Jinping administration.

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This segment aired on July 29, 2015.

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