Advertisement

Taliban Leader Reported Dead05:16
Download

Play
Deputy presidential spokesman Zafar Hashimi speaks during a press conference in Kabul on July 29, 2015. The Afghan government is investigating reports of the death of Taliban supremo Mullah Omar, a presidential spokesman said on July 29, amid frenzied speculation about the rumored demise of the reclusive warrior-cleric. The Taliban have not officially confirmed the death of Mullah Omar, who has not been seen publicly since the 2001 U.S.-led invasion of Afghanistan toppled the Taliban government in Kabul. (Shah Marai/AFP/Getty Images)
Deputy presidential spokesman Zafar Hashimi speaks during a press conference in Kabul on July 29, 2015. The Afghan government is investigating reports of the death of Taliban supremo Mullah Omar, a presidential spokesman said on July 29, amid frenzied speculation about the rumored demise of the reclusive warrior-cleric. The Taliban have not officially confirmed the death of Mullah Omar, who has not been seen publicly since the 2001 U.S.-led invasion of Afghanistan toppled the Taliban government in Kabul. (Shah Marai/AFP/Getty Images)
This article is more than 5 years old.
Mullah Omar is the secretive head of the Taliban. (rewardsforjustice.net)
Mullah Omar is the secretive head of the Taliban. (rewardsforjustice.net)

An Afghan official said today his government is examining claims that reclusive Taliban leader Mullah Mohammed Omar is dead. The Taliban could not be immediately reached on the government's comments about Omar, who has been declared dead many times before.

Omar, the one-eyed, secretive head of the Taliban and an al-Qaida ally, led a bloody insurgency against U.S.-led forces after they toppled him from his rule in Afghanistan in 2001. The rumors come two days before the next round of talks between the Afghan government and Taliban representatives is due to be held in Pakistan.

Peter Bergen, vice president of the New America Foundation, discusses Omar and how his death could affect peace talks, with Here & Now's Robin Young.

Guest

  • Peter Bergen, vice president of the New America Foundation and CNN terrorism analyst.

This segment aired on July 29, 2015.

Advertisement

Advertisement