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Ocean Currents, Drifting Debris And Malaysia Airlines Flight 37005:25
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French police officers carry a piece of debris from a plane in Saint-Andre, Reunion Island on Wednesday, July 29, 2015. Air safety investigators, one of them a Boeing investigator, have identified the component as a "flaperon" from the trailing edge of a Boeing 777 wing, a U.S. official said. Flight 370, which disappeared March 8, 2014, with 239 people on board, is the only 777 known to be missing. (Lucas Marie/AP)
French police officers carry a piece of debris from a plane in Saint-Andre, Reunion Island on Wednesday, July 29, 2015. Air safety investigators, one of them a Boeing investigator, have identified the component as a "flaperon" from the trailing edge of a Boeing 777 wing, a U.S. official said. Flight 370, which disappeared March 8, 2014, with 239 people on board, is the only 777 known to be missing. (Lucas Marie/AP)
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Airplane debris that washed up on a beach on Reunion Island, near Madagascar, could be the first evidence in the search for Malaysia Airlines Flight 370, which disappeared over the Indian Ocean in March 2014 with 239 people on board.

Oceanographer Dr. Erik van Sebille speaks with Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson about how ocean currents can help determine where that debris came from.

Guest

This segment aired on July 30, 2015.

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