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Even If U.S. Economy Weathers Chinese Downturn, Emerging Markets May Get Hit05:56
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An investor gestures in front of screens showing share prices at a securities firm in Hangzhou, in eastern China's Zhejiang province on August 24, 2015. Shanghai shares nosedived 8.49 percent on August 24 as Beijing's latest market intervention failed to restore confidence, with concern mounting about the stalling economy (STR/AFP/Getty Images)
An investor gestures in front of screens showing share prices at a securities firm in Hangzhou, in eastern China's Zhejiang province on August 24, 2015. Shanghai shares nosedived 8.49 percent on August 24 as Beijing's latest market intervention failed to restore confidence, with concern mounting about the stalling economy (STR/AFP/Getty Images)
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The Dow Jones Industrial Average and many U.S. blue chip stocks rebounded today after investors digested more bad news from China. Even as China's stock market slipped further and the Chinese Central Bank made several moves to stabilize its economy, American and European markets showed resilience.

It's possibly good news for American consumers, but not that comforting to citizens in emerging markets, where a Chinese slowdown will have far-reaching impacts. Indonesia, South Africa and Brazil are just a few of the countries that depend on Chinese demand for cheap goods and commodities.

Jason Bellini of The Wall Street Journal discusses this with Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson.

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This segment aired on August 25, 2015.

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