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Ruling Gives Unions Leverage In Negotiations With Franchises03:45
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Juan Hernandez, 8, protests with his mother, who works for McDonald's, and other fast food workers and community activists outside a McDonald's restaurant in the Loop on June 22, 2015 in Chicago, Illinois. The protesters were calling for an increase in the minimum wage to $15 per hour. The demonstration was staged to coincide with the 4th hearing of the Wage Board in New York City as it debates the $15-dollar-per-hour increase for its workers. (Scott Olson/Getty Images)
Juan Hernandez, 8, protests with his mother, who works for McDonald's, and other fast food workers and community activists outside a McDonald's restaurant in the Loop on June 22, 2015 in Chicago, Illinois. The protesters were calling for an increase in the minimum wage to $15 per hour. The demonstration was staged to coincide with the 4th hearing of the Wage Board in New York City as it debates the $15-dollar-per-hour increase for its workers. (Scott Olson/Getty Images)
This article is more than 5 years old.

A ruling yesterday from the National Labor Relations Board gave contract workers and employees of franchises a lot more leverage to unionize.

The NLRB's decision gives those employees the right to negotiate a union contract not only with a franchise owner, but also with the larger parent company. It has implications in the fast food industry, which is locked in a national debate about worker pay and benefits.

Michael Regan of Bloomberg News discusses this with Here & Now's Robin Young.

Guest

This segment aired on August 28, 2015.

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