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After Katrina, New Orleans Media Didn't Leave06:00
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Times-Picayune staff photographer Alex Brandon swims away from the paper in the flooded city of New Orleans during the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina on Tuesday, Aug. 30, 2005. Brandon had swam to the building to get a memory card of photos to the paper. (Bill Haber/AP)
Times-Picayune staff photographer Alex Brandon swims away from the paper in the flooded city of New Orleans during the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina on Tuesday, Aug. 30, 2005. Brandon had swam to the building to get a memory card of photos to the paper. (Bill Haber/AP)
This article is more than 5 years old.

Hurricane Katrina shut down the New Orleans Times-Picayune's presses but that didn't stop the staff from covering the storm around the clock. Radio stations took impromptu calls from government officials, and Brian Williams made his name inside the Superdome.

Journalism at the time was invaluable to the people of New Orleans for providing information they had no access to otherwise, and for holding officials accountable. NPR's David Folkenflik talks with Here & Now's Jeremy Hobson about how that has and hasn't changed in the 10 years since.

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This segment aired on August 28, 2015.

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