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European Commission Head Says EU Must Take More Refugees05:48
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Migrant families ride a train from Gevgelija to the Serbian border on September 4, 2015 in Macedonia. After stopping at a Serbian processing facility for migrants only, most people will continue on foot for the next 6 miles into the Serbian town of Preshevo. Since the beginning of 2015 the number of migrants using the so-called 'Balkans route' has exploded with migrants arriving in Greece from Turkey and then travelling on through Macedonia and Serbia before entering the EU via Hungary. The number of people leaving their homes in war torn countries such as Syria, marks the largest migration of people since World War II. (Dan Kitwood/Getty Images)
Migrant families ride a train from Gevgelija to the Serbian border on September 4, 2015 in Macedonia. After stopping at a Serbian processing facility for migrants only, most people will continue on foot for the next 6 miles into the Serbian town of Preshevo. Since the beginning of 2015 the number of migrants using the so-called 'Balkans route' has exploded with migrants arriving in Greece from Turkey and then travelling on through Macedonia and Serbia before entering the EU via Hungary. The number of people leaving their homes in war torn countries such as Syria, marks the largest migration of people since World War II. (Dan Kitwood/Getty Images)
This article is more than 5 years old.

European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker today warned that Greece, Italy and Hungary can no longer cope with the migrant crisis alone. And he called on EU countries to agree to share 120,000 refugees.

Speaking before the European Parliament in Strasbourg, France, he also unveiled a list of new proposals to help Europe confront its biggest refugee crisis since World War II.

The BBC's Simon Smith is on Hungary's border with Macedonia and joins Here & Now's Meghna Chakrabarti with details on what he's seeing and hearing.

Note: This BBC interview can be heard in the Here & Now podcast or with the WBUR app.

Guest

  • Simon Smith, correspondent with the BBC.

This segment aired on September 9, 2015.

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