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The Other Migrants Crossing Mexico-U.S. Border07:29
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In this June 2, 2007 photo, a migrant begins the swim across the Rio Grande River at the U.S.-Mexico border in Nuevo Laredo, Mexico, just across from Laredo, Texas. Intelligence officials are focusing new attention on these networks that smuggle people from Djibouti, Eritrea, Somalia and Sudan - known havens for terrorists, including al-Qaida - according to an internal government assessment obtained by The Associated Press. (LM Otero/AP)
In this June 2, 2007 photo, a migrant begins the swim across the Rio Grande River at the U.S.-Mexico border in Nuevo Laredo, Mexico, just across from Laredo, Texas. Intelligence officials are focusing new attention on these networks that smuggle people from Djibouti, Eritrea, Somalia and Sudan - known havens for terrorists, including al-Qaida - according to an internal government assessment obtained by The Associated Press. (LM Otero/AP)
This article is more than 5 years old.

Up to half a million Central Americans cross through Mexico to reach the United States every year. The trek has always been dangerous, and since Mexico began cracking down on migrants last year, the risks have increased. But Central American migrants are increasingly joined by migrants from farther afield - places like Bangladesh, Nepal, Somalia and Ghana.

Last year, 700 Africans were detained by Mexican immigration authorities, and that number is expect to go up this year. For them, reaching Mexico is almost a dream come true. Conrad Fox has our report.

This story was produced in association with Round Earth Media, a nonprofit organization that mentors the next generation of international journalists. Manuel Ureste contributed to the reporting.

Reporter

  • Conrad Fox, reporter and project manager for Round Earth Media's Migration Reporting Project. He tweets @willybones.

This segment aired on September 14, 2015.

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