Mass Shootings By The Numbers06:46
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People hold candles during a vigil in Roseburg, Oregon on October 1, 2015, for nine people killed and seven others wounded in a shooting at a community college in Oregon. The shooter, identified by U.S. media as Chris Harper Mercer, 26, opened fire in a classroom at Umpqua Community College in rural Roseburg, then moved to other rooms methodically gunning down his victims, witnesses said. (Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images)
People hold candles during a vigil in Roseburg, Oregon on October 1, 2015, for nine people killed and seven others wounded in a shooting at a community college in Oregon. The shooter, identified by U.S. media as Chris Harper Mercer, 26, opened fire in a classroom at Umpqua Community College in rural Roseburg, then moved to other rooms methodically gunning down his victims, witnesses said. (Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images)
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Responses to the mass shooting in Oregon yesterday, in which at least nine people were killed, include words like "tragic," "devastating" and, as President Obama said, "routine." Mass shootings are so common that there are many that never get national headlines.

The Mass Shooting Tracker online database shows that yesterday marked the 294th mass shooting. Yesterday was the 274th day of the year. The tracker defines a mass shooting as a shooting in which four or more people were killed or wounded.

Mark Follman of Mother Jones magazine joins Here & Now's Robin Young to provide some statistics and context to mass shootings in the U.S.

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This segment aired on October 2, 2015.

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