Medical Charity Demands Probe Into U.S. Airstrike On Hospital05:17
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General Director of Doctors Without Borders, or Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF), Christopher Stokes (right) and Country Representative for MSF in Afghanistan Guilhem Molinie speak during a press conference at the MSF office in Kabul on October 8, 2015. U.S. President Barack Obama apologized to Doctors Without Borders (MSF) on October 7 for a deadly U.S. airstrike on an Afghan hospital, as the medical charity demanded an international investigation. Three separate probes -- by the U.S. military, NATO and Afghan officials -- are underway into the October 3 strike in Kunduz that left 22 people dead. (Wakil Kohsar/AFP/Getty Images)
General Director of Doctors Without Borders, or Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF), Christopher Stokes (right) and Country Representative for MSF in Afghanistan Guilhem Molinie speak during a press conference at the MSF office in Kabul on October 8, 2015. U.S. President Barack Obama apologized to Doctors Without Borders (MSF) on October 7 for a deadly U.S. airstrike on an Afghan hospital, as the medical charity demanded an international investigation. Three separate probes -- by the U.S. military, NATO and Afghan officials -- are underway into the October 3 strike in Kunduz that left 22 people dead. (Wakil Kohsar/AFP/Getty Images)
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The medical charity Doctors Without Borders (MSF - Médecins Sans Frontières) said today it is still demanding an independent investigation into the U.S. airstrike that killed 22 people at its hospital in Kunduz, Afghanistan.

The airstrike last Saturday took place as Afghan forces were fighting to retake the town from the Taliban. Here & Now's Robin Young speaks with a reporter embedded with Afghan troops in Kunduz. Josh Smith is a correspondent and photojournalist for the newspaper Stars and Stripes.

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This segment aired on October 8, 2015.

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