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Searching For Answers In The Russian Plane Crash05:47
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A memorial in Simferopol, a city on the disputed Crimean peninsula, to commemorate  the  victims of a Russian jetliner crash. (Max Vetrov/AFP/Getty Images)
A memorial in Simferopol, a city on the disputed Crimean peninsula, to commemorate the victims of a Russian jetliner crash. (Max Vetrov/AFP/Getty Images)
This article is more than 4 years old.

Russian officials have claimed two black boxes from the site of Saturday's Russian plane crash in the Sinai Peninsula.

All 224 people on board the aircraft were killed. The Islamic State is claiming responsibility for the crash, but both Russian and Egyptian officials are refuting the claim.

Metrojet, the airline carrier, has said the crash was not due to pilot error or mechanical failure.

John Cox, a former commercial airlines pilot and the CEO of Safety Operating Systems joins Here & Now's Peter O'Dowd to discuss thee latest developments.

Guest

  • John Cox, aviation expert, former pilot and CEO of Safety Operating Systems.

This segment aired on November 2, 2015.

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