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Why Americans Love France05:45
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A woman makes a heart sign with her fingers framing a French national flag placed on the arch at the Washington Square Park during a vigil to show solidarity with the citizens of France on November 14, 2015 in New York, a day after the Paris terrorist attacks. Islamic State jihadists claimed a series of coordinated attacks by gunmen and suicide bombers in Paris on November 13 that killed at least 129 people in scenes of carnage at a concert hall, restaurants and the national stadium. (Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty Images)
A woman makes a heart sign with her fingers framing a French national flag placed on the arch at the Washington Square Park during a vigil to show solidarity with the citizens of France on November 14, 2015 in New York, a day after the Paris terrorist attacks. Islamic State jihadists claimed a series of coordinated attacks by gunmen and suicide bombers in Paris on November 13 that killed at least 129 people in scenes of carnage at a concert hall, restaurants and the national stadium. (Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty Images)
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Friday's terrorist attacks in Paris elicited strong reaction in the United States. Artists paused during concerts for moments of silence, and there were gatherings across the country over the weekend. Derek Thompson of The Atlantic joins Here & Now's Jeremy Hobson to look at why Americans feel so close with the French.

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This segment aired on November 16, 2015.

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