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After Paris, Debate Grows Over Security And Liberty05:53
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French soldiers patrol in a metro station in Paris on November 17, 2015, as part of security measures set following Paris' attacks. Gunmen and suicide bombers went on a killing spree in Paris on November 13, attacking a concert hall, bars, restaurants and the Stade de France. Islamic State jihadists operating out of Iraq and Syria released a statement claiming responsibility for the coordinated attacks that killed 129 people and left 352 others injured. (Joel Saget/AFP/Getty Images)
French soldiers patrol in a metro station in Paris on November 17, 2015, as part of security measures set following Paris' attacks. Gunmen and suicide bombers went on a killing spree in Paris on November 13, attacking a concert hall, bars, restaurants and the Stade de France. Islamic State jihadists operating out of Iraq and Syria released a statement claiming responsibility for the coordinated attacks that killed 129 people and left 352 others injured. (Joel Saget/AFP/Getty Images)
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The French president has requested changes to the constitution and stronger powers for the government to conduct its investigation into last week's attack in Paris. What is the balance between national security and civil liberties?

David Cole, a professor of constitutional law, national security and criminal justice at Georgetown University Law Center, discusses this with Here & Now's Indira Lakshmanan.

Guest

  • David Cole, teaches constitutional law, national security, and criminal justice at Georgetown University Law Center. He is also the legal affairs correspondent for The Nation. He tweets @DavidColeGtown.

This segment aired on November 17, 2015.

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