Explosions Rock Jakarta04:55
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Indonesian police secure the area outside a damaged Starbucks coffee shop after a series of explosions hit central Jakarta on January 14, 2016. Gunfire and explosions in the Indonesian capital Jakarta killed at least four people on January 14 in what the country's president dubbed 'acts of terror', with fears that militants were still on the run. Starbucks announced in a statement that the company was closing all of its Jakarta branches 'until further notice' after one of its stores in the Indonesian capital was hit by apparent suicide attacks. (Romeo Gacad/AFP/Getty Images)
Indonesian police secure the area outside a damaged Starbucks coffee shop after a series of explosions hit central Jakarta on January 14, 2016. Gunfire and explosions in the Indonesian capital Jakarta killed at least four people on January 14 in what the country's president dubbed 'acts of terror', with fears that militants were still on the run. Starbucks announced in a statement that the company was closing all of its Jakarta branches 'until further notice' after one of its stores in the Indonesian capital was hit by apparent suicide attacks. (Romeo Gacad/AFP/Getty Images)
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Attackers set off explosions in a bustling shopping area in Indonesia's capital today and then waged gun battles with police.

Five attackers and two civilians were killed and more than two dozen were wounded in the brazen attacks, which followed several warnings in recent weeks by police that Islamic militants were planning something big. ISIS claimed responsibility.

Here & Now's Robin Young speaks with the BBC's Kiki Siregar, who is on the scene.

Note: This BBC interview can be heard in the Here & Now podcast or with the WBUR app.

Guest

  • Kiki Siregar, correspondent for the BBC in Jakarta. She tweets @Kiki_WSiregar.

This segment aired on January 14, 2016.

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