Oregon Refuge Occupation Appears To Be Ending04:49
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Law enforcement agencies operate a checkpoint on a road as a containment strategy surrounding the Malheur Wildlife Refuge January 27, 2016 near Burns, Oregon. Although leaders of a group that illegally occupied the federal buildings were arrested, many armed occupants still on site have said that they intend to stay despite repeated requests to leave. The iconic wildlife tower of the buildings is visible in the upper left of this photograph. (Rob Kerr/AFP/Getty Images)
Law enforcement agencies operate a checkpoint on a road as a containment strategy surrounding the Malheur Wildlife Refuge January 27, 2016 near Burns, Oregon. Although leaders of a group that illegally occupied the federal buildings were arrested, many armed occupants still on site have said that they intend to stay despite repeated requests to leave. The iconic wildlife tower of the buildings is visible in the upper left of this photograph. (Rob Kerr/AFP/Getty Images)
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Eight people left the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge in Burns, Oregon, and three were arrested Thursday morning, after the FBI and Oregon State Police met the occupiers at road checkpoints.

This comes after the armed groups leader, Ammon Bundy, who was arrested with others on Tuesday, made a statement from jail, calling on the remaining occupiers to "stand down" and go home.

Here & Now's Meghna Chakrabarti speaks with Harney County Judge Steve Grasty about the occupation and about how police and the FBI have been handling the situation.

Guest

This segment aired on January 28, 2016.

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