Ireland's Economy Is Coming Back To Life09:45
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U.S. President Barack Obama (right) and acting Prime Minister (Taoiseach) of Ireland Enda Kenny (left) deliver remarks following their bilateral meeting on March 15, 2016 in the Oval Office of the White House, in Washington, D.C. Obama and Kenny discussed the economy in both countries as well as the ongoing immigration crises (Michael Reynolds/Getty Images)
U.S. President Barack Obama (right) and acting Prime Minister (Taoiseach) of Ireland Enda Kenny (left) deliver remarks following their bilateral meeting on March 15, 2016 in the Oval Office of the White House, in Washington, D.C. Obama and Kenny discussed the economy in both countries as well as the ongoing immigration crises (Michael Reynolds/Getty Images)
This article is more than 3 years old.

It might not be a roar, but Ireland is making noise again when it comes to its economy. Once called the Celtic Tiger when its economy was booming in 1990s, things went bust when the housing bubble burst. That forced Ireland to the brink of bankruptcy, saved only by a $117 million bailout from the E.U. and the IMF in 2010.

On St. Patrick's Day 2016, Here & Now's Meghna Chakrabarti talks with BBC business correspondent Russell Padmore in Donegal. He says there are still some challenges, but Ireland’s economy is on the move again.

Note: This BBC interview can be heard in the Here & Now podcast or with the WBUR app.

Guest

  • Russell Padmore, business correspondent for the BBC.

This segment aired on March 17, 2016.

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