Choking Smog Blankets Mexico City04:23
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View from Tlanepantla of Mexico City blanketed by smog on March 18, 2016. Mexican officials lifted a four-day air pollution alert in the nation's densely-populated capital after ozone levels dropped, according to them, to acceptable levels. Mexico City authorities issued the first air pollution alert in 14 years due to high ozone levels, restricting traffic, encouraging children to stay indoors and ordering factories to cut emissions. (Ronaldo Schemidt/AFP/Getty Images)
View from Tlanepantla of Mexico City blanketed by smog on March 18, 2016. Mexican officials lifted a four-day air pollution alert in the nation's densely-populated capital after ozone levels dropped, according to them, to acceptable levels. Mexico City authorities issued the first air pollution alert in 14 years due to high ozone levels, restricting traffic, encouraging children to stay indoors and ordering factories to cut emissions. (Ronaldo Schemidt/AFP/Getty Images)
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Mexico City has been blanketed with smog lately, suffering from the worst air quality in 14 years. The government has limited the number of cars on the street.

Part of the problem is that the cars in Mexico have lower emissions standards for cars than in other countries, even though many low-emissions vehicles are manufactured in Mexico. Here & Now's Jeremy Hobson talks with Benjamin Bain of Bloomberg News about the problem.

Guest

This segment aired on April 18, 2016.

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