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Cybersquatting On Domains Related To The Presidential Race05:24
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Former Republican presidential candidate Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX) and his Vice Presidential candidate, former Hewlett-Packard chief executive Carly Fiorina, speak with the media before participating in a taping of Fox News Channel's The Sean Hannity Show at the Indiana War Memorial on April 29, 2016 in Indianapolis, Indiana. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
Former Republican presidential candidate Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX) and his Vice Presidential candidate, former Hewlett-Packard chief executive Carly Fiorina, speak with the media before participating in a taping of Fox News Channel's The Sean Hannity Show at the Indiana War Memorial on April 29, 2016 in Indianapolis, Indiana. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
This article is more than 5 years old.

Now that Donald Trump is the likely Republican nominee, his campaign is turning its attention to, among other things, picking a vice presidential candidate. Soon enough, either Hillary Clinton or Bernie Sanders will do the same. Once each party has a ticket, it will be time to launch a new campaign website and brand. But that last part - the branding - can be difficult, especially if someone else owns the desired domain name.

Ben Philpott from Here & Now contributor KUT in Austin dives into the world of political cyber squatting.

Guest

This segment aired on May 12, 2016.

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