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The Latest On The Missing EgyptAir Plane05:34
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EgyptAir planes are seen on the tarmac at Cairo international airport on May 19, 2016 after an EgyptAir flight from Paris to Cairo crashed into the Mediterranean on with 66 people on board, prompting an investigation into whether it was mechanical failure or a bomb.
Egypt's aviation minister said he could not rule out that an attack or a technical failure brought down the plane. (KHALED DESOUKI/AFP/Getty Images).
EgyptAir planes are seen on the tarmac at Cairo international airport on May 19, 2016 after an EgyptAir flight from Paris to Cairo crashed into the Mediterranean on with 66 people on board, prompting an investigation into whether it was mechanical failure or a bomb. Egypt's aviation minister said he could not rule out that an attack or a technical failure brought down the plane. (KHALED DESOUKI/AFP/Getty Images).
This article is more than 4 years old.

The latest on the missing EgyptAir flight MS 804 that disappeared early this morning. NPR national security editor Phil Ewing tells Here & Now’s Robin Young that the U.S. could play a role in the investigation because the jet engines were made in the U.S.

Guest

  • Phil Ewing, national security editor with NPR. He tweets @philewing.

This segment aired on May 19, 2016.

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