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Historically Black Colleges Reach Out To Latino Students03:40
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Huston-Tillotson graduate Angelica Erazo, 22, gave her pitch about the benefits of historically black colleges and universities to Luis Betancourt, 15, a high school freshman already thinking about college. The Houston Independent School District held an HBCU college summit at Texas Southern University in May. (Laura Isensee/Houston Public Media)
Huston-Tillotson graduate Angelica Erazo, 22, gave her pitch about the benefits of historically black colleges and universities to Luis Betancourt, 15, a high school freshman already thinking about college. The Houston Independent School District held an HBCU college summit at Texas Southern University in May. (Laura Isensee/Houston Public Media)
This article is more than 4 years old.

Around the country, many historically black colleges and universities are struggling with financial problems and falling enrollment. So some are turning to a new and unexpected pool of potential students: Latinos.

Laura Isensee of Here & Now contributor Houston Public Media reports.

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Laura Isensee, education reporter, Houston Public Media. She tweets @lauraisensee.

This segment aired on July 6, 2016.

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