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How Do You Talk To Young People About Police-Related Violence?

Protesters face off with Baton Rouge police in riot gear across the street from the police department on July 8, 2016 in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Alton Sterling was shot by a police officer in front of the Triple S Food Mart in Baton Rouge on July 5th, leading the Department of Justice to open a civil rights investigation. (Mark Wallheiser/Getty Images)
Protesters face off with Baton Rouge police in riot gear across the street from the police department on July 8, 2016 in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Alton Sterling was shot by a police officer in front of the Triple S Food Mart in Baton Rouge on July 5th, leading the Department of Justice to open a civil rights investigation. (Mark Wallheiser/Getty Images)
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(Editor's Note: Due to a scheduling issue, this segment did not end up airing on July 11 as planned.)

The shooting deaths of two black men by police officers last week in Baton Rouge and Minnesota led to protests across the country. In Dallas, a gunman killed five officers, and wounded seven others plus two civilians during a protest.

Footage of the shootings is everywhere on social media and TV. What do you tell children and young people about what they are seeing and hearing?

Here & Now’s Robin Young speaks with Kevin Washington, president of the Association of Black Psychologists, about talking to young people about police related violence.

Guest

Kevin Washington, president of the Association of Black Psychologists and assistant professor of psychology at Howard University. He tweets @Mwata3. The Association of Black Psychologists tweets @TheABPsi.

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