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FBI Closes The Book On The Country's Most Famous Unsolved Skyjacking Case04:57
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An undated artist's sketch shows the skyjacker known as D.B. Cooper from recollections of the passengers and crew of a Northwest Airlines jet he hijacked between Portland and Seattle on Thanksgiving eve in 1971. (AP)
An undated artist's sketch shows the skyjacker known as D.B. Cooper from recollections of the passengers and crew of a Northwest Airlines jet he hijacked between Portland and Seattle on Thanksgiving eve in 1971. (AP)
This article is more than 4 years old.

Closing one of the longest and most exhaustive cases in the agency's history, the FBI is no longer investigating the mystery of the skyjacker known as D.B. Cooper.

Forty-five years ago Cooper vanished out of the back of a hijacked Boeing 727 into a freezing northwest rain wearing a business suit, a parachute and a pack with $200,000 in cash. The agency said it will preserve evidence from the case at its Washington, D.C., headquarters, but it doesn't want further tips unless people find parachutes — or Cooper's money.

Feliks Banel from Here & Now contributor KUOW in Seattle reminds us about America's most famous unsolved skyjacking case.

Read more on this story via KUOW.

Guest

Feliks Banel, producer for KUOW in Seattle. He tweets @feliksbanel.

This segment aired on July 13, 2016.

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