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Author Draws Line From Lyndon Johnson's 'War On Poverty' To Mass Incarceration06:11
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A woman who stayed at the riot scene in Dixmoor, Illinois in August 1964 is carried to a police van. More than a score were arrested. (AP)
A woman who stayed at the riot scene in Dixmoor, Illinois in August 1964 is carried to a police van. More than a score were arrested. (AP)
This article is more than 5 years old.

President Lyndon Johnson's "Great Society" was intended to lift up the poor and less educated in 1960s America. But Harvard University historian Elizabeth Hinton says it created a situation that eventually led to the mass incarceration of mostly African-American men.

Here & Now's Meghna Chakrabarti speaks with Hinton about her book, "From The War On Poverty To The War On Crime: The Making Of Mass Incarceration In America."

Hear the original Radio Boston segment from June 2016.

Guest

Elizabeth Hinton, assistant professor of history and African and African-American studies at Harvard University. Her new book is "From the War on Poverty to the War on Crime: The Making of Mass Incarceration in America." She tweets @elizabhinton.

This segment aired on July 22, 2016.

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