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Clinton Vows To Oppose Trans-Pacific Partnership As Candidate And As President11:49
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Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton delivers a speech on the U.S economy at Futuramic Tool & Engineering on Aug. 11, 2016 in Warren, Michigan. (Bill Pugliano/Getty Images)
Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton delivers a speech on the U.S economy at Futuramic Tool & Engineering on Aug. 11, 2016 in Warren, Michigan. (Bill Pugliano/Getty Images)
This article is more than 4 years old.

Hillary Clinton stressed her opposition to the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade deal in a speech outside Detroit Thursday, saying: "I oppose it now, I'll oppose it after the election and I'll oppose it as president."

Speaking at a manufacturing company in Warren, Michigan, Clinton said she understands why people are concerned about trade deals, noting that Republican nominee Donald Trump talks about it frequently.

"Trade deals have been sold to the American people with rosy scenarios that did not pan out," Clinton said.

Clinton said that she would "stop any trade deal that kills jobs or holds down wages."

Here & Now's Jeremy Hobson and Robin Young analyze Clinton's speech with NPR's Ron Elving and Jim Zarroli, Here & Now political analyst Jamal Simmons and economist Doug Holtz-Eakin.

The Associated Press contributed reporting to this article.

Guests

Ron Elving, NPR senior Washington editor and correspondent. He tweets @NPRrelving.
Jim Zarroli, NPR business reporter. He tweets @JimZarroli.
Jamal Simmons, Here & Now political analyst and a Democratic strategist. He tweets @JamalSimmons.
Doug Holtz-Eakin, economist, president of the American Action Forum, former adviser to Republican Sen. John McCain and former director of the Congressional Budget Office. He tweets @djheakin.

This article was originally published on August 11, 2016.

This segment aired on August 11, 2016.

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