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Suspected N.Y.-Area Bomber Raises Immigrant Screening Questions06:47
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Evidence teams investigate at the scene of Saturday's explosion on West 23rd Street in Manhattan's Chelsea neighborhood, Monday, Sept. 19, 2016, in New York. Ahmad Khan Rahami, wanted in the bombings that rocked Chelsea and a New Jersey shore town was captured Monday after being wounded in a gun battle with police that erupted when he was discovered sleeping in a bar doorway, authorities said. (Jason DeCrow/AP)
Evidence teams investigate at the scene of Saturday's explosion on West 23rd Street in Manhattan's Chelsea neighborhood, Monday, Sept. 19, 2016, in New York. Ahmad Khan Rahami, wanted in the bombings that rocked Chelsea and a New Jersey shore town was captured Monday after being wounded in a gun battle with police that erupted when he was discovered sleeping in a bar doorway, authorities said. (Jason DeCrow/AP)
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Ahmad Khan Rahami, who is suspected of planting homemade bombs in New York City and New Jersey last weekend, was brought to the U.S. as a child by his immigrant Afghan parents. Other so-called "homegrown terrorists," such as Orlando shooting suspect Omar Mateen, were American citizens.

As politicians debate tougher screening rules for refugees, Here & Now's Jeremy Hobson talks to USA Today's Alan Gomez about whether tougher vetting could have raised red flags or prevented attacks.

Guest

Alan Gomez, immigration reporter for USA Today. He tweets @alangomez.

This segment aired on September 20, 2016.

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