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Myth Busting On The Underground Railroad05:45
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Shirl Spicer and Mark Thorne of the Woodlawn Manor Cultural Park walk a route trafficked by the Underground Railroad. (Martin Di Caro/WAMU)
Shirl Spicer and Mark Thorne of the Woodlawn Manor Cultural Park walk a route trafficked by the Underground Railroad. (Martin Di Caro/WAMU)
This article is more than 4 years old.

When the National Museum of African American History and Culture opens tomorrow in Washington, visitors will be able to view about 3,500 artifacts on display tracing the experience of blacks in America — including Harriet Tubman's shawl and hymnal.

Tubman was a slave who escaped to freedom and helped other do the same through the underground railroad in the 1800s.

The Underground Railroad has long been shrouded in mystery, but Martin Di Caro from Here & Now contributor WAMU took a myth-busting trip down a stretch of the Underground Railroad in Montgomery County, Maryland, and found that the truth is no longer hiding in the woods.

Reporter

Martin Di Caro, transportation reporter for WAMU in Washington. He tweets @MartinDiCaro.

This segment aired on September 23, 2016.

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