Here & Now Here & Now

Support the news

Despite Legal Battles, Arkansas Could Still Execute 7 Inmates. But Should It?07:05
Download

Play
Protesters gather outside the state Capitol building on Friday, April 14, 2017, in Little Rock, Ark., to voice their opposition to Arkansas' seven upcoming executions. (Kelly P. Kissel/AP)
Protesters gather outside the state Capitol building on Friday, April 14, 2017, in Little Rock, Ark., to voice their opposition to Arkansas' seven upcoming executions. (Kelly P. Kissel/AP)
This article is more than 3 years old.

Arkansas faces several legal battles over its plan to execute seven convicted murders in the span of 11 days, apparently to accommodate the state's expiring supply of a lethal injection sedative.

A federal judge issued stays for each of the inmates on Saturday, but the inmates could still face death beginning as soon as Monday night. In addition to the state's rushed schedule, there are other concerns, according to the Fair Punishment Project.

In a report released by the group, each one of the convicted Arkansas murders has problems — including intellectual disabilities, mental illness and childhood trauma — that might preclude them from the death penalty. Here & Now's Meghna Chakrabarti speaks with Jessica Brand, the Fair Punishment Project's legal director, about her group's findings.

This segment aired on April 17, 2017.

Earlier:

Support the news

+Join the discussion
TwitterfacebookEmail

Support the news