As Clients And Caregivers Age, Vermont Revamps Services To People With Disabilities05:18
Download

Play
Henry Wein has cerebral palsy, and he lives in an apartment in Dover. The state provides round-the-clock care, which allows him to live in his own apartment. (Howard Weiss-Tisman/Vermont Public Radio)
Henry Wein has cerebral palsy, and he lives in an apartment in Dover. The state provides round-the-clock care, which allows him to live in his own apartment. (Howard Weiss-Tisman/Vermont Public Radio)
This article is more than 2 years old.

Vermont has long been a leader in supporting adults with developmental disabilities: It was one of the first states in the U.S. to shut down its institutional hospital and move adults with disabilities out into their communities.

But the state is now grappling with how to fund quality services for those with disabilities as they — and their caregivers — age. Howard Weiss-Tisman (@hweisstisman) of Here & Now contributor Vermont Public Radio reports.

This segment aired on August 4, 2017.

Related:

Support the news

+Join the discussion
TwitterfacebookEmail

Support the news