Rising Sea Levels And Beach Erosion On North Carolina's Outer Banks07:39
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Freve Pace stands in front of the house she once owned but had to sell because of the repeated storm damage and erosion of the beach. When she bought it in the 1990s, says says, "There was a dune in front of it. We couldn't see the sea. It became clear we had to sell. I am still sad about it." (Jesse Costa/WBUR)
Freve Pace stands in front of the house she once owned but had to sell because of the repeated storm damage and erosion of the beach. When she bought it in the 1990s, says says, "There was a dune in front of it. We couldn't see the sea. It became clear we had to sell. I am still sad about it." (Jesse Costa/WBUR)
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Harvey, now a tropical storm, is expected to cause significant beach erosion along the entire Texas coastline. Beach erosion is a problem faced by all coastal communities that are experiencing more frequent flooding and more severe storms due to climate change. The United Nations predicts sea levels will rise by 1 to 3 feet by the end of the century. And more recent estimate by NASA and other scientists have projected up to 8 feet or more on the high end.

David Boeri (@davidboeri) from Here & Now contributor WBUR recently traveled to one vulnerable spot — North Carolina's Outer Banks.

This segment aired on August 28, 2017.

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